Friday, 2 July 2010

Crinkle-Crankle Walls


What a lovely crinkle-crankle wall! This caught our eye during a recent Ramble to north Suffolk. This splendid example is opposite the fabulous round tower church at Brampton.  According to Sue Clifford and Angela King in 'England in Particular' (2006 - highly recommended!), most of these walls are found in Suffolk, with many being built in the 1700s. They tend to enclose the kitchen gardens of large house. Their corrugated form lends strength to them - and beauty to the eye. For the Ragged Rambler meandering their way through narrow country lanes, we see something metaphorical in their serpentine aspect.

9 comments:

  1. I wonder if it isn't also a display of wealth. A wall like that takes a lot more work and a lot more bricks than an ordinary wall. In other words a great example of 'showing off', but a beautiful one as well!

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  2. I hadn't considered the 'false Tudor chimney' line of thinking Mr. Many Coats. I will ask Monty.

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  3. I hadn't considered referring to to showing off in the past as the 'false Tudor chimney' line of thinking Esotericus, so I suppose that makes us equal. To paraphrase the noted antiquarian/diarist, John Stow, "Many chimneys, but little heat"
    +Many Coats+

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  4. Perhaps the brickies were pissed!

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  5. Open Toe...

    It has been known for brickies to be inebriated... hmm

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  6. So to 16th century 'Singing Men' at Norwich cathedral!

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  7. What a nice blog, and what a shame I can't follow it without subscribing to Facebook. Oh well...

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  8. Oh, silly me - I've just found a way to follow on Google!

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  9. Hi Tom,

    Thanks for your kind words. We're really glad to have you as a follower.

    Huzzah!

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