Sunday, 15 May 2011

'Museums at Night' Twilight Tower Tours


'Museums at Night' is a national weekend of late openings at heritage venues. As part of this, some members of the Ragged Society of Antiquarian Ramblers joined a tour up the tower of the Cathedral Church of St John the Baptist, Norwich. Everyone was very friendly, and people really went out of their way to make us feel welcome. It was a fascinating experience, and the views were amazing.

We would like to thank all of the cathedral volunteers, staff and HEART (Heritage Economic and Regeneration Trust) who, collectively, made this possible.

Whereas we ascended the 230 steps, you can sit sedately and look at the views we bring you here:



You might also be interested to see a video taken of the streets below...


I think you'll agree - a fascinating perspective. We would encourage you to go and visit this, the more recently constructed of Norwich's two cathedrals. If you do so on a Saturday (from April 23rd-September 24th), there are regular tower tours at 1:30 and 2:30 in the afternoon (weather permitting). These cost £3 per adult, and £1.50 for children of school age. As well as the cathedral at ground level, there are also some very interesting interpretative displays in the new Narthex (welcome centre). There is also a a very nice cafe (reasonably priced!) and a garden which we will be returning to explore in the very near future.

As we Ragged Ramblers are wont to say, having enjoyed a wonderful experience - Huzzah!

For further information about the Cathedral, please click HERE

Following an excellent suggestion by Mr. Many Coats (see comments), by way of contrast, I will add a link to a post about ascending the Anglican cathedral in Norwich, HERE 

~ Munro Tweeder-Harris, Esq. ~

11 comments:

  1. That looks like a good tour, Munro. I was struck how the later cathedral looks very similar to Bath Abbey in you main shot. They are probably of a similar age - they could have even been built by the same team.

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  2. A very atmospheric night it was to Munro. Both I and Mrs Many-Coats had a thoroughly wonderful night! May I suggest though a link to our much earlier Ramble up the Anglian Cathedral Spire by way of a bit of contrast?

    And Tom. Are you aware that the Catholic Cathedral in Norwich is only 101 years old, although as you point out it looks much older!

    +Many Coats+

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  3. It is as you requested Mr. Many Coats - a link is now in place.

    A very understandable misunderstanding Tom. The intention of the design was to suggest antiquity; in architectural historians terms, Victorian Gothic revival rather than the Late Perpendicular of Bath Abbey. However, having looked at images of Bath, I can see what you mean in terms of its bulk and aspect. That looks like a site we Ragged Ramblers would love to visit!

    ~ Munro Tweeder-Harris, Esq. ~

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  4. Alison two steps16 May 2011 at 07:27

    Thanks for the tour. Wonderfull.

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  5. Thank you Munro. I do like a bit of Victorian Gothic revival. The Victorians I think had an interest in the medieval that i think bordered on the obsessive. I suspect they were harping back to some mythical feudal rural idyll where everyone still knew their place!

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  6. As you can see I do think quite a lot...

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  7. Dear Mr. Many Coats,

    I see now that you do think a lot. Previously, I had assumed that you thought very little - particularly on those occasions when you stand leaning on your shovel, dribbling.

    ~ Munro Tweeder-Harris, Esq. ~

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  8. My Dear Munro

    I suspect that you are confusing me with Elias the Shovel who I have seen on many occasions leaning and dribbling. Although he assures me that he is simply moistening the earth to facilitate the shovelling thereof.

    +Many Coats+

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  9. Mother often berated Father for dribbling. That's why she forced him wear a todger shoe between milkings.

    Tea anyone?

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  10. Dear Felatio

    You need to purchase a flask with a pouring spout. A relatively new inovation I believe, where you don't need to take the flask lid off to pour your tea, but simply open but a little. The only drawback is the pour rate is drastically reduced, taking many hours to fill the cup and also lumpy soup gets stuck in the nozzle.

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